TRYP Hotel: Brisbane

Tucked away in Brisbane’s inner creative pocket, sits TRYP Hotel on Constance Street, Fortitude Valley – also known as Australia’s first ever, 65 room, boutique ‘Street Art Hotel’.

 

The building itself posses an interesting past. Presumably around 150 years ago, the space was once a clubhouse for the Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes, the Brisbane chapter of an international and mysterious secret society. An antique plaque from this time was discovered in the development stages of TRYP and is now displayed in the reception area of the hotel. Post clubhouse history, the building was a central backpackers hotel which then became abandoned due to reasons not currently known. It was through this time of abandonment that the space became an inner city hub for local and international artists.

BEFORE:

AFTER: An open landscape rooftop bar, ‘UP on Constance’

Previous features of the abandoned backpackers included level upon level of tags, art and scrawlings constantly changing with each visit. A huge staircase leading up to the highest point of the building also boasted rooftop views and a small shelter tower where one could, (surprisingly enough) get free WiFi by connecting wirelessly to nearby business’s access points. Not the ideal holiday destination for most, but it was in this wasteland state that the space truly flourished.

TRYP’s vision and consideration to stay true to the building’s past street style was a respectful and admirable decision by their developers. As old walls got touched up and painted over, new murals appeared to stay from some of Australia’s most prominent street artists, Rone, Numskull, Fintan Magee and Beastman.

“Their vibrant artworks serve as a foundation for the hotel’s distinctive concept, resonating through every aspect of the business, from the eats to the beats, the boys’ effervescent and evocative creations set the tone for Brisbane’s most audacious inner-city haunt.”

BEFORE:

AFTER:

BEFORE:

AFTER:

Hidden in the stairwell and storage rooms, a few of the buildings original pieces still stand and are now embedded into the iconic history of the TRYP Hotel.

Benjamin Reeve’s original character found on the entry level floor of the abandoned backpackers is now an amicable feature of TRYP hotel thanks to Rone who incorporated the aged work into his commission piece.

This security camera stencil and female character can be found in TRYP’s food storage room, a place you will likely need to seek assistance to find, but is still a preserved artwork.

This Fintan Magee piece painted in the abandoned backpackers many years ago also still remains, though it’s now living inside the confines of a Chur Burger/TRYP storage cupboard.

If you’re yet to check out TRYP hotel, we recommend you do. Looking back at the building’s history and forward with TRYP’s developments arises thoughts of appreciation, acceptance and celebration for graffiti and street art in contemporary society. Trust us, it’s worth the ‘trip’.

Image Credits: TRYP Hotel Brisbane, Abandoned Brisbane, Sarah Hazlehurst

Interview: 5Fingers

Following the interesting arrival of new abandoned art installation, The Opening Hours caught up with the mysterious pair behind the 5Fingers project. Adapting a ‘run by thieves, worn by vandals’ mentality, it seems this local label have a lot more to offer than just fine threads.

What is 5Fingers and how did the idea originate?
We were kicking back over a few drinks, having a rant over some clothing companies and how they plug the same shit just to earn a few dollars. 5Fingers was created not as a business idea, but as a way for us as artists to express our creative side and inject our art into wearable threads. 5Fingers is a clothing line, however as artists, we want to play around a bit and keep our hands on the street by creating innovative installations and art projects.

Give us a run down of this installation.
We just wanted to do something different. We’re so used to the usual street art medium of paper and painting on walls in a 2D form. So to try something new, we’ve thrown up a 3D installation. We used multiple layers of sticky tape to form the letter structure then strategically placed small LED lights to help bring the letters to life. We want to push graffiti down new paths.

Is it still on display at the abandoned mall?
Yeah, it’s still on display and we don’t plan on touching it. It will be interesting to see how it’s doing down the track. We encourage people it to have some sort of fun if they come across it. Change it up, do what ever you want with it.

Describe where you live.
In a government controlled police state, a place we like to call Brisbane.

What do you love about your city?
I guess we love the ignorance. Brisbane is set back in the past with a lot of its infrastructure, trends etc so when people see something new and completely different, it’s fresh and makes a big impact on them.

What’s your background in ‘the industry’?
Growing up both of us got caught up in the street culture. Graffiti, photography, hip hop, skateboarding… It became captivating and I guess we’ve both never really left the scene.

Any other mediums you’re looking to explore?
We want to start pushing the boundaries with new mediums. We have some plans down the track to create an installation using natural elements. You’ll have to keep your eyes peeled for that one.

What can we expect from 5Fingers in the future?
A full range of clothing, along with an integration of cool installations and art projects that provide a new and different perspective on street culture. I guess you could say we don’t just want to be known as just a clothing line.

5Fingers will be launching their website and online store later this month. For more information on the label and their projects, head to their Instagram account, @5fingersclothing.